Designer Floors


Dear Students (and Learning Partners)

We never think about the floor we walk on, do we? Yet, when there is a festival, we usually remember all the ‘support’ and say a thank you, like this:

Rangoli Art

Rangoli Art

Do you make rangolis at home – or help your mother or elder sister in creating one?

Rangoli in its various avatars

Rangolis are known by different names in various Indian states. Different materials are also used in its creation.

In Kerala, it is Puvidal or Pookalam where “Puv” means flower and “idal” or “kalam” means design, i.e. rangoli with flowers.  In Bengal, rangoli is drawn with white rice paste and known as Alpana. In Orissa, rangoli is known as Ossa, while in Tamil Nadu it is called Kolam. Rangoli is known as Muggu in Andhra Pradesh. In Gujarat  we call it Rangvalli and in Rajasthan it is Sathiya.  Rangoli is known as Mandana in Madhya Pradesh,  ChowkPurna in Uttar Pradesh, Sona Rakhana in Bihar and Aripana in Chattisgarh.

Designer floors in so many names and forms! You can use rice paste, turmeric, sindoor, dry herbal colour powders, flowers, leaves and lighted lamps in creating a design. Here are some artistic rangolis made with different materials:

 

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What is Rangoli called in your own language? What materials do you use?

Rangoli is one of the oldest folk arts of India. It is mentioned in Chitralakshana, the earliest Indian treatise on painting. Usually, women create rangolis, but the origin of rangoli is mythically associated with the god Brahma, who is supposed to have sketched human figures on the wall and breathed life into them!

Where do you suppose rangolis were used? In kings’ palaces – in durbars and dance halls, in temples, at entrances to homes, in puja mandaps. Can you think of any other special places where rangolis were created?

Even Buddhist mandalas, like the one below, were symbolically associated with rangolis:

Mandala

Mandala

Are you a beginner? Then here is a video for you which shows you basic techniques in a very simple pattern. Try it at home, and let me know how you succeeded, in Comments. You could also email your first-attempt rangoli pics to me at principal@dpstapi.net. Then, I’ll post them.

 

If you wish to learn more, click on  Rangoli where you will find a lot of information in the website menu.  

Happy floor-designing!

Principal

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30 responses to “Designer Floors

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  4. Mam I really loved the rangoli patterns and the floor designs. I read the full information and I will even try to make a beautiful rangoli.

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  7. I love making Rangoli Ma’am,yesterday I made Rangoli in the balcony at my home with my friend. You have post very beautiful Rangoli designs today, I will make Rangoli out of it. Thank you Ma’am.
    Devika

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